B R Lakin Preaching

Bascom Ray Lakin (January 5,[1] 1901- March 15, 1984) was a Baptist preacher and evangelist.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

B R Lakin, the Circuit Rider

B. R. Lakin was born on a farm near Fort Gay, West Virginia, on the Kentucky border. His mother had prayed for a “preacher man” and had dedicated him to God even before he was born. Lakin attended a one-room schoolhouse in West Virginia through the 4th grade. Later, when he realized the need for more education, he attended Moody Bible Institute while pastoring several churches. Eventually Bob Jones University and (the now defunct) Kletzing College bestowed honorary doctorates.

 

Lakin was converted to Christ during a revival meeting when he was sixteen and baptized in Big Hurricane Creek. Within a week he had preached his first sermon. During the 1920s he served as circuit-riding preacher, riding a mule from church to church through the mountains and foothills of rural West Virginia and Kentucky. In 1939, he was called to assist E. Howard Cadle (1884-1942) at the Cadle Tabernacle in Indianapolis, Indiana, a church that seated ten thousand with an additional fourteen hundred seats for the choir.[2] Cadle conducted a daily radio program, “Nation’s Family Prayer Period,” on the 50,000-watt clear channel WLW in Cincinnati, and the program became the most listened to religious broadcast during the 1930s. Upon Cadle’s death in 1942, Lakin became senior pastor and continued the broadcast. Although Lakin did not have Cadle’s charisma, he was heard in thousands of homes across the United States and thereby became a nationally known Gospel preacher.[3]

In 1952, Lakin began a thirty-year evangelistic ministry, preaching in some of the largest evangelical churches in country. He is said to have seen a hundred thousand conversions to Christ through his ministry. Even shortly before his death in 1984, at age 82, Lakin still traveled extensively and was one of the most sought after fundamentalist preachers in America. Lakin’s sermons were a combination of wit, Bible teaching, and a strong Gospel appeal. For instance, his advice about dealing with enemies was “Love them, pray for them, and outlive them.”[4]

Lakin and his wife, Violet, had only one child, a son who was early killed in an automobile accident. They “adopted” the young Jerry Falwell, and Lakin mentored and “poured himself” into Falwell’s Lynchburg ministry.[5] The department of religion at Falwell’s Liberty University is named in honor of Lakin, who is interred on the campus.[6]

 

Here is Dr. Lakin Preaching at Dr. Jerry Falwell’s church in Lynchburg, Virginia, before a crowd of thousands and recorded for television where millions would hear him.  This is a wonderful Bible message by the old, circuit riding preacher from West Virginia.  It is a rare thing that you have the opportunity in this day and time to hear a man with this history and with power.  Listen with an open heart.

This message is divided into four (4) parts for easy downloading.  Enjoy

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w64YUD2yOlc

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g6MeZQKrAOc&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ub4WXEsvbro&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kGU0Hwm6D5Y&feature=related

How to Find God

SEEKERS, FINDERS

By Michael Guido / Metter, Georgia

Michael Guido

Comedian Red Skelton was once asked to speak to a college student body on the subject of religion. At the end of his speech, during a question and answer session a student asked, Why can t I find God?

Skelton quickly responded, For the same reason you can t find a cop. You re not looking for one.

King David had something to say to those who say that they can t find God: The heavens proclaim the glory of God. The skies display His craftsmanship. Day after day they continue to speak and night after night they make Him known.

What is so obvious about God is that He is so obvious to those who are looking for Him. In this one psalm David writes that God can be found in the heavens (v.1-4), in nature (v.4-6), in the instructions He has given in His Word (v.7-11), and the story of redemption that can be witnessed in the life of the Psalmist himself (v.12-14).

What a wonderful summary of the story of salvation! We have been surrounded by unimaginable displays of God s craftsmanship that display His power. Yet His power is not an end in itself. It is revealed ultimately and finally in the work of His Son s life, death and resurrection. David spoke of that when he asked God to deliver him from sin so that he could be free of guilt and innocent of great sin.

Prayer: We thank You, Lord, for loving us so much that You did everything possible to reach and redeem us through Christ. In Jesus Name. Amen.

Scripture for Today: Psalm 19

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Don’t Let this Happen to You, or Yours

SINNERS IN THE HANDS OF
AN ANGRY GOD

-Their foot shall slide in due time- Deut. 32:35

This is a classic sermon, perhaps the most famous sermon ever recorded in America, preached by Jonathan Edwards. Mr. Edwards is credited with helping start the second great spiritual awakening in America with this sermon. It was delivered in 1741, a time when emotionalism in the pulpit was in great disfavor. Mr. Edwards made sure no emotionalism was displayed in his reading of this sermon. It was read in poor lighting and with the full manuscript in hand. Still, people came under mighty conviction during the message–some shouting, “My Lord, man! Do something to save us!!!” Grown men grasp the pillars to keep from sliding into Hell. Powerful message that deserves your full and prayerful attention. –Editor

-Their foot shall slide in due time- Deut. 32:35
In this verse is threatened the vengeance of God on the wicked unbelieving Israelites, who were God’s visible people, and who lived under the means of grace; but who, notwithstanding all God’s wonderful works towards them, remained (as ver. 28.) void of counsel, having no understanding in them. Under all the cultivations of heaven, they brought forth bitter and poisonous fruit; as in the two verses next preceding the text. The expression I have chosen for my text, Their foot shall slide in due time, seems to imply the following doings, relating to the punishment and destruction to which these wicked Israelites were exposed.

Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God

SINNERS IN THE HANDS OF
AN ANGRY GOD

-Their foot shall slide in due time- Deut. 32:35

This is a classic sermon, perhaps the most famous sermon ever recorded in America, preached by Jonathan Edwards. Mr. Edwards is credited with helping start the second great spiritual awakening in America with this sermon.  It was delivered in 1741, a time when emotionalism in the pulpit was in great disfavor.  Mr. Edwards made sure no emotionalism was displayed in his reading of this sermon.  It was read in poor lighting and with the full manuscript in hand.  Still, people came under mighty conviction during the message–some shouting, “My Lord, man!  Do something to save us!!!” Grown men grasp the pillars to keep from sliding into Hell.  Powerful message that deserves your full and prayerful attention. –Editor

 

Jonathan Edwards 

In this verse is threatened the vengeance of God on the wicked unbelieving Israelites, who were God’s visible people, and who lived under the means of grace; but who, notwithstanding all God’s wonderful works towards them, remained (as ver. 28.) void of counsel, having no understanding in them. Under all the cultivations of heaven, they brought forth bitter and poisonous fruit; as in the two verses next preceding the text. The expression I have chosen for my text, Their foot shall slide in due time, seems to imply the following doings, relating to the punishment and destruction to which these wicked Israelites were exposed.  Click this Link for full message: http://bit.ly/q9XK6i

Trust God without Doubting

DON’T DOUBT

By Michael Guido / Metter GA

Michael Guido

Samuel Francis DuPont was a successful Admiral in the United States Navy. But on one occasion he suffered a humiliating defeat. Following this loss he went to his commanding officer and carefully explained why he lost the battle.

At the end of his explanation, his commanding officer said, “There’s one more reason you did not mention. You did not believe that you could win.”

Doubt leads many of us into defeat. It destroys our determination and undermines our vision. Whenever we doubt God’s power or ability, we place our trust in someone or something else. It is as though we are saying, “God, we don’t trust You so we are going to try to solve our problems without You.”

Jesus once said, “If you really believe, you can say to this mountain – May you be lifted up and thrown into the sea – and it will happen!” Jesus used this powerful illustration to emphasize the fact God can do the impossible. God answers our prayers when we pray in faith, have unselfish motives, know that what we ask for will bring glory to Him, will extend His kingdom on earth and is in keeping with His will for our lives.

Prayer: Lord, may we have enough confidence in Your Word to believe that all things are possible. In Jesus’ Name, Amen.

Scripture for Today: Mark 11:22 So Jesus answered and said to them, “Have faith in God.

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My Dad, Tim Russert

Luke Russert: What I Learned From My Dad

Tim Russert

“Dad”—no title or honor in his life carried more significance to my father, Tim Russert. He once told Oprah Winfrey, “When my life is over, there’s nothing more I’ll be judged on than what kind of father I was.” And he was a wonderful one.

He was not only my best friend, but my compass. While he was alive, he guided me with his actions and advice. Since he’s been gone, those “lessons of life,” as he once called them, have continued to give me counsel and comfort. Here are three of them.

“Believe in yourself.”
If there was one phrase my father never liked to hear, it was “I can’t.” His dad—my grandpa—was a garbage man from South Buffalo, N.Y. He never got to finish high school and held down two jobs to provide for his family, but he never complained. Through education and years of hard work, my dad rose from South Buffalo to become the preeminent political journalist of his generation.

When I was a freshman in high school, I had a terrible time with geometry. My dad found me a tutor, but I still struggled. So my teacher suggested I meet with him at 7 each morning before school for extra help. I told my dad, “That’s crazy! I can’t do that!” He replied, “You’re doing it. I’ll bring you.” Every morning at 6:45 a.m., we’d leave the house. Despite working 12-hour days, often with a Today show appearance between 7 and 8 a.m., my dad never once missed driving me to school.

After months of studying, I was facing the final exam. I was so nervous. If I bombed, I was looking at summer school and—worst of all—failure. On the day of the final, my dad took me to school. He got out of the car and walked with me the first 20 yards. Then he hugged me and said, “Luke, believe in yourself. You can do it. Whatever happens, it’ll be okay. I love you, and I know you can do this.” His words made me realize I needed to trust in my ability and in the hours of work I’d put in. I ended up passing, and it’s still one of my proudest achievements. When I got my grade, the first person I called was Dad. He screamed, “Yes! You worked your butt off, buddy! You earned it, and you believed in yourself!”

Even now, whenever I worry that a task is too much for me or have doubts about performing my job as a Capitol Hill correspondent for NBC News, I think back to that geometry exam. No matter how hard something is, if you’re willing to work, you can succeed. I’m forever grateful to Dad for that lesson.

“It’s okay to be scared.”
In 2004, my dad and I were on a South Bend, Ind.–to–D.C. flight that hit very bad turbulence. The plane kept lurching, and it seemed to fall hundreds of feet in a few seconds. I was terrified, and I held on to the armrests for what I thought was literally dear life. But Dad, a veteran flier, didn’t flinch. He put his hand on my back, saying it would be okay, and eventually we reached smoother skies. Still, I walked away from that experience with a fear of flying. Even though I dreaded getting on airplanes, I forced myself to travel. But because I wanted to appear tough, I didn’t mention my fear to anybody.

One Sunday night, I was due to fly back to Boston after visiting family and friends in Washington, D.C. The sky looked ominous, and I hoped my flight would be canceled. It wasn’t. Dad drove me to the airport, and he could tell I wasn’t myself. I was curt and furiously tapping the door handle. As we pulled up to the terminal, I really started sweating and I blurted out the truth: I was terrified about flying. He said, “I’m coming in with you.” At the counter, to my astonishment, my dad used his airline miles to get himself a ticket to Boston! I asked, “Don’t you have to be on the Today show in the morning?” He responded, “I do, but I’m going through security and walking you to the plane.” I was mortified—I was 21 and I needed an escort. I told him not to worry. My dad said, “It’s okay to be scared. Let’s talk.” We went through security and had a beer at the airport bar. He told me not to be afraid—that airlines only fly under safe conditions, that pilots are very well trained—and he quoted a statistic about air travel being the safest form of travel. He also said to think of turbulence as “rough waves that hit a boat. It might get choppy, but you know you won’t sink.” When boarding was announced, he said, “I love ya, buddy. Call me when you land,” and I got on the plane. Even though the flight was a bit bumpy, my dad’s boat analogy eased my mind.

I learned that night it’s okay for a man to show fear and vulnerability. My dad could have said, “Suck it up. It’s only an hour-and-a-half flight.” Instead he went out of his way to support my weakness. To this day, I don’t believe in a “no fear” attitude. All of us have fears, and they’re real. But if you can acknowledge them and understand them—you might need help, like I did—you can overcome them. I’m still not crazy about flying, but whenever I step onto a plane, I think of Dad’s image of a boat in the ocean and it brings me tranquility.

Tim and Luke

“Remember the little things.”
People are always coming up to me with a “Tim Russert story”: about politics, sports, Buffalo, or just a chance encounter. Often, it’s about a thoughtful thing my father did. Dad was a big believer in random acts of kindness. It was not uncommon for me to come back to my room in college and find a FedEx box containing magazines, a Twix bar (my favorite), and a note from him. The packages brightened my day. It wasn’t so much what they contained—it was that my dad, the busiest man I knew, took the time to show he was thinking about me.

When I started at NBC News, a coworker sought me out and told me a story I’ll never forget. He was working for my dad when his own father became seriously ill, and he needed to take days off. Whenever he asked my father’s permission, my dad always said yes. But he did much more. My coworker talked about the many emails and phone calls he got from Dad, just checking up on him and his sick parent. When his father passed away, my dad sent flowers and gave him all the time off he needed. The man said, “I hadn’t even been at NBC for that long, so to know Tim Russert cared that much about me and my family meant the world to me.”

I’ve tried to continue my dad’s caring ways, whether it’s by making a quick phone call, giving an unexpected gift to a friend, or helping someone who’s a few dollars short at the grocery store. Take it from me and my dad—the little things do matter. (This story appeared in Parade Magazine, June 11, 2011.) http://bit.ly/ltParP

 

Tim Russert's son, Luke

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Luke Russert, an NBC News correspondent, is following his Dad’s lead on and off the job.

Editor’s Note: This  is not a Christian story in our usual form, but it is very much Christian in the love and fellowship expressed by this father to his son.   You will find deep meaning and experience a number of emotions as you read this story from Luke about his famous father, Tim Russert.

 

Worry

Michael Guido

WHY WORRY?

By Michael Guido / Metter, Georgia

A reporter once asked Henry Ford the question, Do you ever worry?

No. I believe that God is managing my affairs. With God in charge, I believe that everything will work out for our best. So, what s there to worry about?

Worry is like going back and forth in a rocking chair: a lot of motion and no forward movement. It can disturb our thinking, disorganize our work, destroy our health and steal our life. It has never calmed a fear or brought peace to a troubled heart.

Worry is nothing more than anticipating some calamity or chaos that will probably never come our way. It normally has no substance or power except what we allow it to have as it invades our minds and controls our thoughts.

When we allow worry to muddle our minds, we need to call upon God immediately. We must ask Him to replace each worry with His promises and ask for an extra portion of faith and trust in His goodness and grace. He knows what is in our future and every need that we will ever have and is committed to caring for us.

Prayer: Help me, Father, to increase my faith in You as I learn to trust Your promises and accept Your will. In Jesus Name, Amen.

Scripture for Today: Matthew 6:31-32 Therefore do not worry, saying, What shall we eat? or What shall we drink? or What shall we wear? For after all these things the Gentiles seek. For your heavenly Father knows that you need all these things.

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